When Panshan Baoji was near death, he said to the monks, “Is there anyone among you who can draw my likeness?”
Many of the monks made drawings for Panshan, but none were to his liking.
The monk Puhua stepped forward and said, “I can draw it.”
Panshan said, “Why don’t you show it to me?”
Puhua then turned a somersault and went out.
Panshan said, “Someday, that fellow will teach others in a crazy manner!”
Having said these words, Panshan passed away.

“He [Thelonious Monk] played each note as though astonished by the previous one, as though every touch of his fingers on the keyboard was correcting an error and this touch in turn became an error to be corrected and so the tune never quite ended up the way it was meant to.” — Geoff Dyer, But Beautiful

Issa

The critics outside of criticism feel unscalable,
I said.

And he let down the rope ladder from the treehouse.
I climbed

up and selected a cigar, posed to me in the humidor.
And smoked

it as he spoke. What I mean to say is that
I am

wowed by how starchy this pear has become.
Which pear?

you ask. The pear of literature, made stiff
by those

who think they’re in the know. They’re wrong!
The way

to go, he continued, picking apart a leaf, is
to cut

loose: to unbung the still hole in the world’s core.

lbjlibrary

lbjlibrary:

August 27, 1967. The Daily Diary describes President Johnson’s trip to Dupont Circle to look at “hippies.”

“As the car turned onto Independence Avenue, the President said that he would really like to take a drive out to Dupont Circle and to the 18th and Columbia Road area to look at “hippies,” because he’d never seen one, he said…

At Dupont Circle, the President asked Mrs. Johnson to try to find some “hippies” for him to see—not many were out, but the President did get to see a couple of them. The car followed the outer section of the circle two times around, and then moved to the inner section…for two times around. The second time around the President got a good look at the long haired, necklace draped, rope tied clothed fellows sitting around on the benches. He took special interest in one who had a bundle of pamphlets under his arm, distributing them to anyone who would take them.”

Photo of Dupont Circle from Google Maps Streetview.

Photo of “Hitchhiker with His Dog, ‘Tripper’, on U.S. 66.” from photographer Charles O’Rear as part of the Environmental Protection Agency’s DOCUMERICA project. Check out more O’Rear photos from the project on the National Archives’ flickr page

books0977
books0977:

Unknown banjo player from near Savannah, Georgia. (Photograph by Victor C. Schreck, 1902). From 1995 Library of Congress exhibition on slave life. The content proved so offensive to a number of African-American employees that the exhibit was removed within a few hours.
The banjo was commonly played by slaves in the quarters. African in origin, the instrument provided simultaneously both a melodic and a percussive accompaniment for improvised verses. Under the guise of humor, slave musicians criticized and mocked the planter class.

books0977:

Unknown banjo player from near Savannah, Georgia. (Photograph by Victor C. Schreck, 1902). From 1995 Library of Congress exhibition on slave life. The content proved so offensive to a number of African-American employees that the exhibit was removed within a few hours.

The banjo was commonly played by slaves in the quarters. African in origin, the instrument provided simultaneously both a melodic and a percussive accompaniment for improvised verses. Under the guise of humor, slave musicians criticized and mocked the planter class.